TCSNMY7 & TCSNMY8 in SF : October 2010
View only
 
Share
 

 
TCSNMY7 & TCSNMY8 in San Francisco, October 2010
This document can be viewed by anyone using the following URL. I hope that it will be of
use to others. Consider it a freely-available, public resource. [http://bit.ly/cGaImK]
Contact: Rob Greco (robertogreco@gmail.com and rgreco@tcslj.org)
Post-trip Update: A big thanks to Robin Sloan, Javier Arbona, Saheli Datta and everone else
who contributed to this document and met up with us during our visit to SF. Links to
student-created documentation of the trip can now be found at the following two locations (both
offer the same information) or directly via the links that follow:
Unspeakable Group:
Ruby's Reflection: http://bit.ly/dm2VPN
Charlie's Reflection: http://bit.ly/acbcST
Anthony's Reflection: http://bit.ly/b3UpwY
Max's Reflection: http://bit.ly/bERssr
Tatiana's Reflection: http://bit.ly/bHWMK9
Brianna's Reflection: http://bit.ly/bp7bRL
Sofia's Reflection: http://bit.ly/b5MBoU
Brotherhood of Steel:
Moose:
Outline: The seventh and eighth grade students in the Nelson Middle Years program at The
Children’s School of La Jolla will be taking their annual trip in October 2010. This year they will be
travelling to San Francisco for a look at the city through non-tourist perspectives. Students will be
planning and leading the trip with the help of TCS faculty members and contacts in San
Francisco.
Precedent: Last year the same students took a similar excursion to Los Angeles (in four days),
allowing the students (a total of 20 sixth and seventh graders) to plan and lead almost the entire
trip. We gave them a list of potential locations with permission to add more, as long as they were
not the well-worn tourist paths. Then, the students began narrowing down their options and
sorting the locations into areas of LA to be covered. The following constraints were set: arrive by
Amtrak train from San Diego, stay at a predetermined hotel located in Downtown LA, only use
the LA Metro system and walking for transportation, visit one house of worship per day (to tie in
to our  studies of contemporary religion), include a lunch and dinner plan, stay withing the food
budget, etc. Three small groups of 6-7 students were formed to plan each of our four days in LA
(one group planned the half day of our arrival and half day of our return). While we were away,
students were in charge of navigation, time management, restaurant reservations (if necessary),
etc. Mishaps were expected and often resulted in the most delightful aspects of the trip.
So, aside from the week, the rough number of students involved (some minor enrollment
fluctuation might occur over the summer), and our accommodations (a hostel in Fort Mason),
none of the details for our fall trip to San Francisco are set.
Dates for travel: October 3-9 (Sunday, October 3 and Saturday, October 9 will mostly be
transit, settle-in, and prepare-to-leave days)
Dates for planning: Students begin the school year on September 7. Planning will begin that
week and will be on-going until departure on October 3.
Number of students: eighth graders (11), seventh graders (8), TOTAL (19 students, plus 4
chaperones)
Primary Expectations: The primary expectations for the trip are (1) that the students step out of
their element and see the world from other perspectives while avoiding the Disneyfied, sterilized
stuff that they are exposed to too often; and (2) that they drive most of the decision-making, even
when working with our contacts in SF. Our school program is very much student-led, where
faculty and others ask more questions than provide answers, so as students coordinate with
those that will help in SF (maybe with even a Skype chat beforehand), we're thinking that many
possible outcomes could emerge. Ours is definitely not the traditional school approach.
Possible constraints (including some certain constraints): food budget, public transportation
and walking only, no chain restaurants, mapping component, photography/video component,
each group takes on a different perspective (architecture, landscape, play, transportation,
education, art, food, etc.), each group finds an expert on their topic
Possible structure: Groups (four total of five students each) spend the first two days preparing
something (maps? ARG?) with local experts (You!?) for the other groups to explore with or
without a guide on one of the final days of the trip.
The idea is for the students to be offered a palette of lesser-known locations and perspectives on
the city. We want to avoid tourist destinations except in passing on our way to other locations.
We would not be completely opposed to visiting some of the museums, even though they are
usually on the tourist path. Having spent on airfare and accommodations, and needing to eat,
free activities and venues are preferred.
Another idea would be to try on the role of middle school flâneur (in small groups) using some
sort of tool like a Drift Deck to increase serendipity and drive discovery.
Possible themes for group(s) to explore: libraries, neighborhoods, watershed, history,
wildlife, preservation, gentrification, homelessness, policy, urban gardening, alternative maps,
city officials, art (public or private)
Possible media for creating self-directed tour and/or documenting the trip: a GPS
connect the dots? QR codes posted at locations throughout the city pointing to each other?
Paper or digital maps? Documentary? ARG?
Resources/tools that could likely be available to the students while on the trip: SFMTA
Muni Passports ($26 for 7 days, not good for BART), paper maps, a few simple cell phones, a
few iPhones, an iPad or two (probably wifi only), several iPod Touches, several digital cameras,
an HD video camera or two, tripods. All students have laptops, but we would rather not take
them with us. Is there anything else that might be useful?
Worth Mentioning: You may already be familiar with the work of Colin Ward. His Streetwork:
The Exploding School (more here and here) and The Child in the City are clearly influences
behind this sort of school excursion.
Massive starter-list of possible destinations and topics with online references (most
come from years of tagging items with "sanfrancisco" in Delicious, but see also Britta
Gustafson’s bookmarks tagged sf: http://www.delicious.com/britta/sf)
Mapping and Geography (some not SF-specific)
Interesting mapping projects and photography projects
Mundane Journeys
City Sense
San Francisco Crimespotting (Thanks, Robin. I hadn’t realized they had a SF version.)
Cabspotting
EveryBlock
MapJack
DIY City
SF0 (SFZero) (ARG)
The Go Game
Transporter App
Routsey App
Architecture and Geography
Urban spelunking (legal) and undersea ruins and Sutro Baths and decommissioned sites and other ruins
SF Federal Building (We saw, but did not enter, the Caltrans building in LA last year)
The "Gonz Gap"
Japan Town
Perspectives on living in SF
The Contemporary Jewish Museum
Alternate learning environments, Coworking
The Crucible
Stamen
Twitter
Children's Day School (We know the Head of School)
Presidio Hill School (We know the Head of School)
The Urban School
Lick-Wilmerding
Jewish Community High School of the Bay
French American International High School
Ecole Bilangue de Berkeley
The Athenian School
Grace Cathedral
Oakland Cathedral of Christ The Light
Novella’s Ghost Town Farm (“Farm City”)
Cheeseboard/Arizamendi (Workers Coops)
Urban Permaculture guild
San Francisco burrito (via @lukeneff)
Oakland-specific
Scraper Town
Turf Dancing
Oakland Crimespotting
RS notes: saw Stamen on the list; that would be totally bad-ass. Their office is in the middle of the Mission,
almost hidden Batcave-style -- and inside it’s the very Platonic form of a hip designer’s space. Also, some of
their tools (e.g. SF Crimespotting) would make interesting windows into the city.
Gotta watch the video of Market Street from 1906 (pre-earthquake) on YouTube.
The Prelinger Library is very cool; it might not be the best place to take the class (it’s small) but it might be
interesting to connect w/ Rick Prelinger and get him to speak w/ you guys. Also, his “Lost Landscapes of
San Francisco” movie(s) is/are online (on archive.org) and absolutely fascinating. Very cool to see the city
through time, from the turn of the 20th century onward.
More TK!
JA notes: Mostly my "expertise" is on military bases and landscapes. One way to understand the Bay Area
today is to understand how WWII drastically reshaped the city—and the culture. There are some incredible,
sort-of out-of-the-usual sites to visit and much to learn from them. Most if not all can be arrived at via public
transport. My personal topic for my dissertation looks most closely at the Concord Naval Weapons Station
and the Port Chicago Memorial. The Memorial itself is very hard to visit because it's on an active military
base and they don't often give you permission to go on. Now that I think of it, Concord--although the Bart
gets you there-- might not be too hospitable, just cus we or they'd have to walk quite a ways to the entry of
the military base, and that in itself is worth seeing. But maybe another time...
Other sites are way closer to downtown SF, so that might be more do-able.
Aside from the military landscape, which of course goes beyond the bases and involves, as you might
imagine, the sites of leisure and of living, I can also speak to the topic of bikes, transport and the history of
Critical Mass. I'd love to work more with the students to sort of devise a tour that uncovers the sites of the
bike movement. After all, Critical Mass was invented here in SF!
I can also be available to work on their studies of policy or history... There's definitely a lot that can be
learned from the small clues and hints of the places that are no longer with us and disappeared thanks to
"redevelopment". Another person that could be of great help would be Rachel Brahinsky from my
department. She works on the Fillmore as one part of her dissertation (and also the Bayview) so she might
be interested. Do you want me to forward this to her?
Another idea that occurs to me is to go to downtown Oakland. You can walk around the downtown, study
successive waves of development, and within a short walk you can really see the trajectory of architecture
from the early 20th century to the present, including City Beautiful, Art Deco, Modernism, Pomo, and even
some, of I dunno... I guess late-20th century corporate finesse I guess I'd call it (Catholic Oakland Cathedral
by SOM is a possibility). Keep Oakland in mind -- definitely possible, and there's good food in Chinatown...
I could also contact another friend of mine that perhaps can help you with urban gardening in the East Bay.
She works at a Berkeley school
Saheli’s Notes:
I inserted some comments in their context, but in general: there are a lot of possibilities. I’m
afraid I don’t have that many interesting connections right now, except to Athenian & Scream
Sorbet. There are *a lot* of interesting houses of worship, and I only added a few. But both the
ethnic Tibetan & wider Tibetan Buddhist community is quite large here, as are the Zen
communities. Historically there’s a big and very old Sikh community in Northern California, which
is the oldest significant desi community in the United States and has a very interesting history.
There’s also a relatively large Afghan community in the East Bay, and of course a big Indian &
Pakistani communities with the attendant Hindu, Muslim, Sikh, Parsi & Syriac partitions. There’s
a big Ethiopian community in the East Bay, and a lot of Russians in San Francisco. I’ve put out
some emails trying to find out what some good mosques to visit might be. Sadly, there aren’t
that many good Hindu temples to visit, and they’re really out of the way, but the Fremont Temple
might be BARTable.
If you’re interested in the Bay’s history as a shipping town, I think Todd Lappin (“Telstar
Logistics”) might be a good resource, and I can put you in touch with him. In general he knows a
lot about weird  places in the bay area, his flickr is worth checking out.
I know that the Exploratorium & California Academy are ‘touristy’ places, but I still think they’re
worth a visit, especially as they’re the real deal: people really do research and build things there.
But CAS is quite expensive.
I kind of think an interesting theme might be manufacturing. There are several chocolate
factories still in the area, and some interesting green manufacturing businesses.
Sorry, pretty scattershot, more TK.
More from Saheli via Farhad:
After asking around, I've been informed that the Muslim Community Association (MCA) in Santa
Clara is a great place for tours. Your friend should check out the web site at:
http://www.mcabayarea.org/. A tour can be arranged in either of the following ways:
1) Visit this website to fill out a request form for the tour at
Or
2) Contact The MCA Outreach Coordinator Dian Alyan directly at 408.727.7277 Ext 402 or
dian.alyan@mcabayarea.org.
If Dian asks who referred your friend, my cousin Bilal Asghar deserves the credit.
Other notes:
analyze tone and mood of SF (then later do a compare/contrast w/ LA) (via @rushtheiceberg)
 
 - saheli just brainstorming
some other potential themes:
science, making things,
manufacturing, small
businesses, internationalism,
electricity, energy, ethnic
communities,
 
 - saheli: more brainstorming:
audio recorders, specimen
collection kit, flower pressing
kit, (what are they learning in
science class this year?)
 
the ‘founders’ of Critical Mass
and is involved with
CounterPulse, which is a
performance space, sometime
zine/website, and educational
group. CounterPulse & another
critical masser, Joel
Pomerantz, run a lot of biking
and walking tours of SF
biogeography & history,
especially transportation
history.
 
 - saheli Should be open by
then, I’m friends with the
owner, who’s also a beekeeper
& programmer; great story
teller, the process of making
sorbet is very interesting.
 
 - saheli there are more local
farms and gardens and
botanical resources than I can
count; if the kids really want to
go to town on this let me know.
 
 - saheli I know the gardening
teacher
 
 
 - saheli I live near here, not
that much to see in itself--but
very near the Thai Buddist
Temple I link below.