Projects (0)

    Climate Change

    Jared Osborne Feb 20, 2009

    A public project for researching information on climate change.

    Tags (75)

      Users (4)

        Cytes in the Climate Change project

        help

        Showing 1 - 20 of 81 Cytes

        < 1 2 3 4 5 >
        Sort by Date

        Sort by Date

          • View Cyte

            Heat Alert System - heatplan

            Australia Melbourne heatwave
            Cyted by
            Jared Osborne on Jun 4, 2010

          • View Cyte

            Fuel cell of the future promises cleaner energy

            clean energy
            Cyted by
            Jared Osborne on Mar 2, 2010

          • View Cyte

            Global warming: Undeniable evidence | Comment is free | The Guardian

            basic information climate change science
            Cyted by
            Jared Osborne on Feb 1, 2010

          • View Cyte

            Crowd spells out feeling about climate change

            protest
            Cyted by
            Stephen Foley on Jan 12, 2010

            "our future is in your hands"
            st kilda beach, melbourne

            They then removed the "y" to change the final emphasis to "our hands"

          • View Cyte

            Britain's cold snap does not prove climate science wrong | Leo Hickman and George Monbiot | Environment | guardian.co.uk

            uk weather winter
            Cyted by
            Leanne O'Shea on Jan 9, 2010

            An article which discusses how some sceptics are using the cold winter dismiss climate change. I nice article pointing to the idiocy inherant in much of the skeptics arguments.

          • View Cyte

            Turnbull blasts Abbott's 'bullshit' climate change stance

            Australia Turnbull policy Liberal Party
            Cyted by
            Leanne O'Shea on Dec 6, 2009

          • View Cyte

            Time for some straight talking on climate change > Malcolm Turnbull MP > Malcolm's Blogs

            Australia Turnbull policy Liberal Party
            Cyted by
            Leanne O'Shea on Dec 6, 2009

          • View Cyte

            ABC News - Special Events Blog: Copenhagen Climate Change Conference

            adaptation agriculture
            Cyted by
            Jared Osborne on Dec 3, 2009

            "There may, indeed, be some marginal health gains from warmer weather in some populations" says Professor McMichael. "But these objectors are missing the real point. Climate conditions are fundamentally important for all manner of things that our health and lives depend on. Mosquitoes and salmonella bacteria also like hotter weather, and rice yields decline by 10 per cent for each additional 1 deg C rise in temp. Slight warming of the sea surface heightens the intensity of cyclones, and, on land, increase the severity of droughts."

          • View Cyte

            ABC News - Special Events Blog: Copenhagen Climate Change Conference

            adaptation heatwave health impacts
            Cyted by
            Jared Osborne on Dec 3, 2009

            So it was a change of pace to interview the ANU's Professor Tony McMichael, a medical graduate and epidemiologist with vast credentials who is regarded as one of the world's leading authorities on the health impacts of climate change.

            He speaks quietly, calmly. "The politicians have not got the message that the stakes in all of this go beyond economic inconvenience or disruption. The stakes are about the stability of human society and the health of the human population," he says.

            His message is simple. Climate change will make us sick. The effects in Australia can already be seen, he says. More deaths and hospitalisations during heatwaves and more exposure to potentially fatal extreme weather events such as bushfires, floods and storms.

            There are also indirect effects such as a greater incidence of diarrhoea which increases by 5 per cent for every 1 degree temperature rise as well as more debilitating mosquito-borne diseases such as Ross River virus and dengue fever. North Queensland recently suffered its worst outbreak of dengue fever in 50 years with more than 1,000 people infected from November last year.

            "And there are problems for rural Australia where many communities are bearing the brunt at the front-end of climate change. I'm running a range of studies looking at the mental health consequences for people in eastern and south-eastern Australia which looks like it's facing long term drying and changed environmental and economic circumstances," says Professor McMichael.

            There are longer term concerns that the potential displacement of millions of people from more vulnerable nations because of flooding or other severe climate change effects would break down authorities' ability to monitor the spread of various diseases. Or the arrival of new ones.

            There is a growing body of work in this area. A report on the Copenhagen conference website states "there is growing evidence that ongoing deforestation, rising temperatures and unusual rainfall patterns have already expanded the risk of diseases being transmitted from animals and insects to humans."

            These include malaria-carrying mosquitoes now found in South Korea and ticks that transmit Lyme disease now spreading in to Sweden and Canada because of warming temperatures.

          • View Cyte

            Heat-Reflective Paints

            adaptation technology heatwave building materials
            Cyted by
            Jared Osborne on Jul 27, 2009

            Heat-Reflective Coatings

            Looking for a GreenPainter to advise you on Heat-Reflective paints? Click Here!

            Paint coatings are now available that may significantly improve a buildings' insulation properties, thereby leading to reduced energy costs and wastage. These products should be considered by specifiers for their ability to lower greenhouse emissions.

            These paint products are most effective when using light colours, as light colours can reflect up to 80% of solar radiation.

            Dark colours traditionally absorb solar radiation more than light colours. However, sunlight is made up of 51% infra-red light. By replacing conventional black pigments with special cool colour technology black pigments which reflect infra-red radiation, it is possible to reduce heat absorption by the substrate, without altering the colour. This results in the coating become a heat-reflective coating, even in dark colours.

            This technology helps mitigate the urban heat island effect. Astec Paints is an Australian manufacturer of cool coatings technology, GECA certified, Energy Star tested, and recognised by BASIX in NSW. Astec Energy Star comes with a 15 year guarantee.

          • View Cyte

            Permafrost melting a growing concern › News in Science (ABC Science)

            carbon permafrost
            Cyted by
            Leanne O'Shea on Jul 11, 2009

            evidence of increasing melt in the permafrost

          • View Cyte

            State must brace for more heatwaves, deaths | theage.com.au

            Human Health
            Cyted by
            Leanne O'Shea on Jun 7, 2009

            increased deaths related to heat waves

          • View Cyte

            Monbiot.com » A Self-Fulfilling Prophecy

            adaptation climate justice
            Cyted by
            Jared Osborne on Jun 4, 2009

            We're all doomed, it's very hard to adapt, first world is taking the piss (again).

            A Guardian investigation reveals that the rich nations have promised $18bn to help the poor nations adapt to climate change over the past seven years, but they have disbursed only 5% of that money(12). Much of it has been transferred from foreign aid budgets anyway: a net gain for the poor of nothing(13). Oxfam has made a compelling case for how adaptation should be funded: nations should pay according to the amount of carbon they produce per capita, coupled with their position on the human development index(14). On this basis, the US should supply over 40% of the money and the European Union over 30%, with Japan, Canada, Australia and Korea making up the balance. But what are the chances of getting them to cough up?

            There’s a limit to what this money could buy anyway. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says that “global mean temperature changes greater than 4°C above 1990-2000 levels” would “exceed … the adaptive capacity of many systems.”(15) At this point there’s nothing you can do, for example, to prevent the loss of ecosystems, the melting of glaciers and the disintegration of major ice sheets. Elsewhere it spells out the consequences more starkly: global food production, it says, is “very likely to decrease above about 3°C”(16). Buy your way out of that.

            And it doesn’t stop there. The IPCC also finds that, above three degrees of warming, the world’s vegetation will become “a net source of carbon”(17). This is just one of the climate feedbacks triggered by a high level of warming. Four degrees might take us inexorably to five or six: the end - for humans - of just about everything.

            Until recently, scientists spoke of carbon concentrations - and temperatures - peaking and then falling back. But a recent paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that “climate change … is largely irreversible for 1,000 years after emissions stop.”(18) Even if we were to cut carbon emissions to zero today, by the year 3000 our contribution to atmospheric concentrations would decline by just 40%. High temperatures would remain more or less constant until then. If we produce it we’re stuck with it.

            In the rich nations we will muddle through, for a few generations, and spend nearly everything we have on coping. But where the money is needed most there will be nothing. The ecological debt the rich world owes to the poor will never be discharged, just as it has never accepted that it should offer reparations for the slave trade and for the pillage of gold, silver, rubber, sugar and all the other commodities taken without due payment from its colonies. Finding the political will for crash cuts in carbon production is improbable. But finding the political will - when the disasters have already begun - to spend adaptation money on poor nations rather than on ourselves will be impossible.

            The world won’t adapt and can’t adapt: the only adaptive response to a global shortage of food is starvation. Of the two strategies it is mitigation, not adaptation, which turns out to be the most feasible option, even if this stretches the concept of feasibility to the limits. As Dieter Helm points out, the action required today is unlikely but “not impossible. It is a matter ultimately of human well being and ethics.”(19)

          • View Cyte

            Monbiot.com » A Self-Fulfilling Prophecy

            adaptation Copenhagen future projections
            Cyted by
            Jared Osborne on Jun 4, 2009

            Quietly in public, loudly in private, climate scientists everywhere are saying the same thing: it’s over. The years in which more than two degrees of global warming could have been prevented have passed, the opportunities squandered by denial and delay. On current trajectories we’ll be lucky to get away with four degrees. Mitigation (limiting greenhouse gas pollution) has failed; now we must adapt to what nature sends our way. If we can.

            This, at any rate, was the repeated whisper at the climate change conference in Copenhagen last week(1). It’s more or less what Bob Watson, the environment department’s chief scientific adviser, has been telling the British government(2). It is the obvious if unspoken conclusion of scores of scientific papers. Recent work by scientists at the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, for example, suggests that even global cuts of 3% a year, starting in 2020, could leave us with four degrees of warming by the end of the century(3,4). At the moment emissions are heading in the opposite direction at roughly the same rate. If this continues, what does it mean? Six? Eight? Ten degrees? Who knows?

          • View Cyte

            China teams up with Singapore to build huge eco city | World news | The Guardian

            China eco cities
            Cyted by
            Jared Osborne on Jun 4, 2009

            China developing new eco city, touted as framework for developing world, yet carbon footprint is not very ambitious. Small steps forward.

          • View Cyte

            Climate policy 'to create regional jobs'

            Australia job creation
            Cyted by
            Leanne O'Shea on May 24, 2009

            report on the likely generation of jobs due to action on climate change

          • View Cyte

            Water supply | Melbourne dams at record lows | O'Shannassy

            Australia water rainfall Melbourne
            Cyted by
            Leanne O'Shea on May 22, 2009

            Article from The Age, detailing water storage levels for Melbourne Dams, and the changing rainfall patterns across the country.

          • View Cyte

            Crowd spells out feeling about climate change | theage.com.au

            politics Australia
            Cyted by
            Leanne O'Shea on May 22, 2009

            Protest on St Kilda's beach about government's policies.

            In a well-planned and choreographed protest, thousands of people turn out at St Kilda beach to say their piece.

          • View Cyte

            Fuel efficiency | Car pollution minimum standards considered

            politics Australia cars
            Cyted by
            Leanne O'Shea on May 22, 2009

            Proposal for Australia to adopt mandatory fuel efficiency standards.

          • View Cyte

            Obama moves to improve car efficiency - Telegraph

            politics USA cars
            Cyted by
            Leanne O'Shea on May 22, 2009

            Obama announces proposal to require increased fuel efficiency.