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    Joe Dollard Feb 15, 2010

    Best places to have coffee in San Francisco and the East Bay

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            LUXEtasy » Cruisin’ for a Brewin’ – Melbourne’s Best Coffee?

            Cyted by
            Joe Dollard on Jan 3, 2011

            St. Ali. 12-18 Yarra Place, South Melbourne. T: +61 3 9686 2990. W: stali.com.au
            Brother Baba Budan. 359 Little Bourke Street, Melbourne. T: +61 3 9606 0449. W: brotherbababudan.com.au
            Dead Man Espresso. 35 Market Street, South Melbourne. T: +61 3 9686 2255. W: deadmanespresso.com.au
            Sensory Lab. 297 Little Collins St, Melbourne. T: +61 3 9643 2222. W: sensorylab.com.au
            Outpost. 9 Yarra Street, South Yarra. T: +61 3 9827 8588. W: stali.com.au

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            Local 123: Great coffee in the East Bay

            Cyted by
            Joe Dollard on Mar 30, 2010

            apparently this place is great

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            HX Love - Managing the Brew Temperature • Home-Barista.com

            cooling flush
            Cyted by
            Joe Dollard on Mar 27, 2010

            Most home baristas set their espresso machine's pressurestat
            somewhere between 0.8 and 1.2 bar (measured at the top of the cycle) and
            then determine the flush amount to bring the group to the target
            temperature. I prefer the pressurestat setting on the lower end of the
            acceptable range because it slows the overheating of the water in the
            heat exchanger. The drawbacks are that it diminishes recovery time and
            especially steam production, some espresso machines to the point where
            they no longer can create microfoam well. But if you're preparing drinks
            only for yourself and perhaps a couple friends, the lower end of the
            boiler pressure range is easier to manage temperature-wise than the
            upper end. The barista's job is easier in the former case because the
            rebound time is long enough that the difference in brew temperature
            between a delay of 15 seconds and 25 seconds after the flush and the
            beginning of the extraction isn't dramatic. In contrast, a
            miscalculation of ten seconds risks producing an over-temperature
            extraction (very dark initial crema, black edges) for a pressurestat
            setting at the high end of the acceptable range.

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            HX Love - Managing the Brew Temperature • Home-Barista.com

            Cyted by
            Joe Dollard on Mar 27, 2010

            It may surprise you how little time is required for the HX to
            recover after a flush. That is the point to watch—if you wait too
            long, the first third of the shot will be all boiling water.
            You'll recognize it by the dark, oily crema ring that forms. Such
            an espresso is palatable served as a latte, since the extra bitter
            flavor adds "punch" to the drink that you may like, but
            they're pretty rough straight up.

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            Fine-tuning HX brew temperature

            cooling flush
            Cyted by
            Joe Dollard on Mar 27, 2010

            great video showing when to end your cooling flush

            Flushing water out of the group until you’ve poured the same amount of "steady flow" water will give you the same starting temperature shot-after-shot. No fuss, no muss, and takes less than 30 seconds.

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            Managing the Brew Temperature of HX Espresso Machines • Home-Barista.com

            hx cooling flush
            Cyted by
            Joe Dollard on Mar 27, 2010

            One problem, however, is that being surrounded by water at no less than
            250°F, it won't be long before the water inside

            the heat exchanger

            will also be super heated. Extracting an espresso using this
            water will blast the coffee with blistering hot steam and assure an
            extremely hot, bitter brew.

            Enter the most important HX ritual you'll ever learn: The HX
            cooling flush. The next section will introduce why, what, and how to
            ready an HX

            for brewing espresso. The essentials are covered in the
            first few paragraphs. Experienced baristas may wish to continue reading
            the rest of the section for a discussion of the thermodynamics behind
            these efficient and fascinating machines.

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            Managing the Brew Temperature of HX Espresso Machines • Home-Barista.com

            hx
            Cyted by
            Joe Dollard on Mar 27, 2010

            overview of how heat exchangers work

            The heat exchanger,

            shown in the simplified schematic to the right as
            the tube passing through the center of the boiler, is responsible for
            warming the incoming fresh water to near the coffee's optimal brew temperature before it
            reaches the grouphead. Once all that solid brass is at the desired brew
            temperature, it acts as a dampener to either reduce the temperature of
            the incoming water if it's a little too hot, or raise it if
            it's a little too cool. Your goal is to get the group as close to
            precisely the desired brew temperature as possible so it can "fine
            tune" the somewhat volatile temperature of the water exiting

            the heat exchanger.

            This of course begs the important question that follows.

            How to get the group to the desired brew temperature
            The means by which the brew group arrives at the desired coffee brew
            temperature depends on the espresso machine's design. Many commercial
            machines rely on direct thermal conduction by attaching the group
            directly onto the boiler. Other machines, like those we're
            considering in this article, use a thermosyphon to circulate water from
            the boiler through the group, as shown in the schematic to the right. As
            the water in the heat exchanger portion of the loop warms (double
            lines), it rises and flows towards the group (red arrow). The water then
            cools and descends towards the bottom of the group (blue arrow),
            returning to the boiler where it reheats and repeats the circuit.

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            Seattle Coffee Gear - Accessories - Espresso Gear Attento Click Mat

            tamp scale
            Cyted by
            Joe Dollard on Mar 25, 2010

            looks really cool, I wonder how well it works

            Now you can be certain you're tamping with 30lbs. of pressure without getting the bathroom scale involved!The only pressure-sensitive tamping base on the market, Espresso Gear designed this to signal when a set pressure has been reached. You can vary your ideal pressure between 22lbs and 55lbs by simply turning a screw, giving you the ultimate control over your extraction.

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            Bluebottle Coffee Company

            blue bottle
            Cyted by
            Joe Dollard on Feb 15, 2010

            on the way to the office. Seems like one of the most popular coffee places with decent coffee around

            KIOSK
            We have an odd but convivial little coffee kiosk in San Francisco's Hayes Valley:
            315 Linden Street, SF, CA 94102

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            Four Barrel Coffee - Mission - San Francisco, CA

            Cyted by
            Joe Dollard on Feb 15, 2010

            Four Barrel Coffee
            4 star rating
            based on 396 reviews
            Rating Details »

            Category: Coffee & Tea [Edit]
            Neighborhood: Mission
            375 Valencia St
            (at 15th St)
            San Francisco, CA 94103
            (415) 252-0800
            www.fourbarrelcoffee.com

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            farm:table - Civic Center/Tenderloin - San Francisco, CA

            espresso farm:table
            Cyted by
            Joe Dollard on Feb 15, 2010

            the coffee was pretty good - just make sure you don't get a latte (super weak). And if you ask for an extra shot it gets really expensive ($2 on top of the $3.50 for the latte)

            farm:table
            4.5 star rating
            based on 126 reviews
            Rating Details »

            Categories: Coffee & Tea, Breakfast & Brunch, American (New)
            Neighborhoods: Civic Center/Tenderloin, Nob Hill
            754 Post St
            (between Jones St & Leavenworth St)
            San Francisco, CA 94109
            (415) 292-7089
            www.farmtablesf.com

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            Mojo Bicycle Café

            espresso funky
            Cyted by
            Joe Dollard on Feb 15, 2010

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            Sightglass Coffee - SOMA - San Francisco, CA

            espresso
            Cyted by
            Joe Dollard on Feb 15, 2010

            their cappuccinos are very strong, so be careful ordering a double

            Sightglass Coffee
            4.5 star rating
            based on 57 reviews
            Rating Details »

            Category: Coffee & Tea [Edit]
            Neighborhood: SOMA
            270 7th Street
            (between Howard St & Folsom St)
            San Francisco, CA 94103
            sightglasscoffee.com/